Future_of_Magento

The Future of the Magento Ecosystem

The Magento community is thriving and wants to push forward fast. This presentation is about feelings and ideas that live within the community and that I’ve discussed with many at Meet Magento conferences and on IM chats in the past months. I presented this at the Magento Snowcamp in Austria in January and this week at Meet Magento in Spain. Let me know what you think in the comments!

madrid-city-hall

Free tickets to Meet Magento Spain

If you really need a break: next week is the first Meet Magento Spain in Madrid! Two days packed with Magento items (check the schedule), lot’s of international/English sessions, a hackathon (those are fun!) and of course a big Spanish Fiesta! I will also have two presentations: on day 1 about Online Persuasion, on day 2 about The Future of the Magento Ecosystem.

Order your tickets with the code ‘xxxxxxxx‘ (EDIT: The event is sold out!) and you’ll get a free ticket (€90 discount), only for the first 10 people! Don’t forget to book the hotel and your flight though ;).

Hope to see you there! Read more

Image by SimpleIllustrations

Checkout optimization 2/7: Layout

Image by SimpleIllustrationsCC by-nc-nd

This week I’ll be exploring the layout of the checkout process which is the second blog in this series. if you missed the first, checkout the Checkout Optimization Introduction post.

The way webpages are structured is of great importance to user experience. And on pages where getting to the end of a process like the checkout, it’s key to your shops succes. Here are some guidelines related to the layout and other visual elements on checkout pages.

Clear error messages

Make it crystal clear to your website visitors when they make a mistake and what can be done to fix the problem (without the use of technical jargon). The erroe message should be clear (high visual contrast) and placed near the error (and not only on top of the page). De notification should be clear and short.

W8q2u 300x150 Checkout optimization 2/7: Layout

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checkout optimization

Checkout optimization 1/7: Introduction

Deploying an e-commerce platform is no easy task. Creating a logical checkout process that doesn’t confuse your users might be an even more daunting task. Checkouts can be overly complex thus requiring great focus and dedication from the user to complete it. This of course hurts your conversion and your turnover. Following some easy guidelines can boost your conversions greatly.

In this series of 7 blog posts I’ll show you how you can make your e-commerce checkout process easier for the user and a lot more profitable for you as a shop owner. And it’s not just me making things up, it’s actually based on research ;).

Part 1/7: Series Introduction

Amazon com Shopping Cart 271x300 Checkout optimization 1/7: Introduction

Most shops don’t lack visitors and many have beautiful designs. Usability of the default home-, category-, product- and searchpages are on an acceptable level and you’ve applied many of the online persuasion tips to get people to buy your product or service. Users visit your product pages and many of them add your awesome items in their online shopping basket.

SCORE! Another day with lot’s of products sold and customers added to your CRM!

Or not (yet)…? Read more

magento-hackathon

Magento Hackathon

This weekend is the first #MageHackDay: the international Magento Hackathon. I’m currently sitting in Amsterdam at Byte Internet, one of the 22 offline locations for the 26 hour event.

For those who have no idea about a hackathon, let me try to explain…

After the Hackathon intoduction hangout: Everyone Ready? Set? Go!!!!

what Magento Hackathon

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review_picture

Embarassing fact: Magento 2.0 was announced 3 years ago today

At the Magento Developers Paradise in 2010, then CTO Yoav Kutner announced Magento 2.0. Later that year, Magento announced that we could expect a stable release somewhere in Q4 2011.

Today, 3 years after that first announcement, we haven’t even seen any sign of a beta release.

At the time, the developers already realised that Magento needed a major code overhaul to support the growth of its customers and to keep up with the fast growing e-commerce world. So instead of building upon the 1.0 codebase, they decided to start from scratch to have maximum flexibility and to make development much faster.

Oh, the irony.

In the fast-paced e-commerce world that’s, that’s (very) embarrassing. If eBay doesn’t get its act together, Magento customers will fall behind the competition and switch platforms.

The original announcement can be viewed on YouTube.